We often work with young people who are in care or experiencing an unstable home-life, leading to low self-esteem. We give our students their confidence back by educating and nurturing them into a routine, providing wellbeing and advocacy services, helping them to regain their trust in others and to realise that they have potential. Our work is truly child-centred. We listen, we give voice, we create tailored programmes and we go above and beyond to treat each student with the respect and attention that they deserve.

BETH

With extremely high needs relating to autism and safeguarding risks around CSE, Beth was one of our most complex students. She had been passed around multiple care settings due to aggressive and volatile behaviours. It was clear to us that she craved stability and a positive way to vent her frustrations. We began helping her by crafting routine, consistency and using therapeutic de-escalation strategies. It was difficult to provide a meaningful academic focus to Beth, so we shifted the focus to one of enterprise. By the end of this provision, Beth had project managed and performed in her own dance show and, with our support, transitioned to a suitable residential school for children with autism.

"Beth is engaged and positive about her experience with her tutors and appears calmer and happier than she has been in a long time" - Beth's Guardian

 
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ZAK

Zak was referred to us during a difficult move from a placement with a foster carer to a residential school. He had frequent and rapid mood swings, attention seeking behaviours that could manifest into risky and antisocial conduct, and very low morale. Having missed the majority of Year 5, Zak required academic support but he craved more than that. To aid Zak in making his move and ensure that the transition would stick, we provided a pastoral focus to Zak’s intervention. Our 9 hours per week with Zak included a combination of learning and facilitating his orientation so that he felt comfortable and safe with his new carers and peers. We conducted some engagement on evenings and weekends to make sure he could attend extra curricular activities, such as Saturday morning football, helped him to articulate any concerns, and aided him overall to become resilient, robust and settled.

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